William Saito Invited to Mentor Russia’s Technology Rebound

William Saito was a child prodigy who grew up to become a Japanese political strategic advisor and cybersecurity expert. Saito was raised in Walnut, Calif, located just a few hours from the Silicone Valley. The child prodigy grew up during the 1970s and 1980s, which was an exciting time in technology with the introduction to personal computing. The future cybersecurity expert used his personal computer to assist him with math and science problems. Saito was a first American born to Japanese immigrants.

 

William Saito acquired a computer programming internship when he was 10. While in college, Saito ran his own software business from his college dorm room. His software business grew to become I/O Software. In 1998 and 1997, Saito was awarded the Ernest & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year. The future entrepreneur sold I/O Software to Microsoft when he was 34 in 2000.

The United States, South Korea, China, and Japan are well-known for their technology. On the other hand, Russia only has Kaspersky. Will Russia ever be known for their technology? In time, United States Homeland Security went publicly against Kaspersky software in the late part of 2017. Other countries went along with the United States. Sales of Kaspersky software plummeted. Despite the downfall of Kaspersky, Russia has made some advances in the world of technology.

 

According to William Saito, Russia realizes that it is very dependent upon oil and gas energy. Renovo, a large technology company from Russia, has invited William Saito to help them increase their sales in the global technology marketplace. Saito believes that it is possible for Russia to become highly successful. Mr. Saito thinks that if Russia is creative, they can rebind in technology. Saito suggests that Russia use their oil and gas to inspire their work on cybersecurity. Russia will be able to brush off the stigma they have, but it takes time. Russia has promise in the global technology market.

 

 

 

 
https://ideamensch.com/william-saito/